Being Transgender In North Clackamas

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Being Transgender In North Clackamas

Bullying laws.

Bullying laws.

Bullying laws.

Bullying laws.

Brodie Ruiz, Reporter

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A large societal issue in today’s generation is the mishandling and discrimination against the youth of the Transgender community. But recently, school administrators have been gradually acknowledging the issues and vulnerable population of the Transgender youth in a school setting. Even then, there are still districts of schools in many states that lack the safety from the problems and discrimination the Transgender youth face.

 

The Transgender community, although now starting to be seen as a more regular thing, it is still very much hated and ignored around the world. Lots of the questions and thoughts that people have are not being spread as much as they should. Lots of people see the trans community as an alien like group of people. Many actually have laws which restrict schools from discussions about the issues faced by the Transgender community which can include Arizona, Utah, and Texas to name a few.

North Clackamas is a positive district for the Transgender community and fairly well attuned towards the trans community. For instance, Schellenberg and Rex Putnam High School have restrooms that accommodate Transgender students. There is also a Unity Club at Rex Putnam High School which promotes social unity and equality for students, providing safe space for students to discuss their experiences or issues, as well as working together on certain exercises or assignments to “aim to engage both the student body and the community through various service projects to support  goal.” as it says on their website. Similarly there is also a GSA (Gay Sexuality Alliance) club at Clackamas High school which involves a lot of the same space to discuss problems and provide support.

 

Antonio Harrison goes to Clackamas High School. When asked about his experience in North Clackamas he says, “Personally, I have had a pretty positive experience earlier here at Schellenberg and over in Clackamas.” Toni knows a lot of about being transgender and also knows a lot of the community. Toni hasn’t modified his body yet, and hasn’t taken any hormones to turn him into a male but is hoping that once he turns 18 he will begin the full transition.

 

Toni agrees that the transgender community is misrepresented as he has had multiple experiences throughout school and in his day to day life. He gave an example of someone he met recently that had rings on each hand, and each hand had a different color, representing male and female. Whichever hand they put up was what they ought to be known as for the day. “It was just a dumb idea” said Tony. This person would get upset because everyone would assume their gender wrong every day, and would even get mad if they were called they, it, them or other gender neutral pronouns”. Toni, despite being trans, agrees that he does occasionally have his own personal gripes toward certain people who he feels shouldn’t be recognized as his own community. Toni says “It’s people like this that make people believe that the transgender community are ill and insane”. Toni likes to joke about sensitive topics, even about things like himself, trans, feminism, sexism, and gay/lesbian people, though he takes them seriously.

 

Teddie Flores identifies with gender neutral pronouns just recently moved from Phoenix, Arizona. When asked about how they feel with their transition they responded that they do enjoy their transition, and that they do feel satisfied because they feel they can much better express them self since transitioning. Teddie, responding to a question about moving into Oregon, said that earlier, when making their transition they happened to be around a supportive group of people at the time that respected them and their transition, but did have their own complaints with how the state treated the LGBT community. For instance, the state only provides limited protection against discrimination on basis of sexual orientation. The state also requires surgery for the altering sex on a birth certificate. However, they say that they recently moved here so it would be hard to make their judgement just now.

 

Overall, North Clackamas School District is a positive environment for students that identify as trans, gay, lesbian or bi. Looking back at the research, schools of the district may often incorporate the discussion of Transgender students and their issues in their teaching, as well as after school activities dedicated to the support of Transgender students, and are frequently accustomed to transgender students.

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